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CATHOLIC COUNTER-REFORMATION GLOSSARY

Over time, in every movement, every religious community, certain expressions develop, certain events take on a particular importance. This is naturally true also for our own religious Community, the Little Brothers and Sisters of the Sacred Heart, founded by Father Georges de Nantes, as well as for the Catholic Counter-Reformation movement that grew from it. To those who come into contact with the writings of our Father many expressions may seem obscure, many events mentioned may leave them wondering.

To make sure that new readers get the most out of this site, we have decided to establish this glossary, defining terms coined by our Father or giving a brief history of events specific to our Community or to French history and culture that might be unfamiliar to our readers.

(The words in blue characters are [or will one day] be defined in this glossary)

    ALL1CLOP
  • 1
  • 150 Points (The)From 1975 on, Father de Nantes became more and more concerned about elaborating a doctrine for the restoration of the Church and the rebuilding of Christendom. From his reflection and studies, our Father developed a body of doctrine that he organised and summarised in 150 articles. These became known as the 150 Points of the Catholic, Royal, Communitarian Phalange.
    This doctrine was divided into three parts: 50 Catholic Points. Our Catholicism is integral. It ardently embraces the whole Faith, sacramentary discipline and moral teaching of the Roman Church. 50 Political Points. The science and art of politics are oriented towards maintaining the tranquillity of the temporal order and safeguarding the common good. Since Father de Nantes reflected especially on his own nation, France, this explains why he entitled this section ‘Royal,” as the traditional and only legitimate government of France is the monarchy of divine right. These principles, however, can either be applied directly or adapted to the political traditions of other nations. 50 Communitarian Points. These points describe the principles that allow the development of a spontaneous ecology. It encompasses in its natural harmony the whole secret of peaceful human happiness. Recently, to comply with the last wishes of our Father, these 150 points were revised by Brother Bruno to integrate into them the supereminent role that the Blessed Virgin Mary plays in our natural and supernatural existence as revealed by the message of Our Lady of Fatima. The text of The 150 Points of the Phalange can be read on our website.

  • C
  • Cathedral of lightFather Georges de Nantes waged a formidable battle to destroy both the heresies of the Modernists and Progressivists that were vitiating the Faith of the Church, and the schism of the Integrists that was tearing her asunder. At the same time he undertook a positive work of strengthening the doctrine of the Church with all the contributions of modern exegetical and archaeological sciences. To refer to this positive side of his work, in August 1995, our Father coined the phrase: ‘a cathedral of light.’ He wrote: “The retreats, lectures and meditations, our ‘Logia’, sessions and camps have furnished building stones, very diverse materials. We did not realise how well they had been preconceived to constitute one day a cathedral of light. Now we have reached the point where all this has to be fit together and cemented, to the glory of Mary, Our Lady of the Rosary, of Fatima, Whose message, like that of Paray-le-Monial, is a fundamental revelation of truth and love.”

  • L
  • Letter To My FriendsDuring the early years of Father de Nantes’ priestly ministry, he made “friends,” many of whom became his spiritual sons and daughters. He began writing each of them letters of spiritual direction. Soon, however, these friends became so numerous that Father was no longer able to address individual letters to each of them. Thus, for the first time, in October 1956, he addressed his first collective “Letter To My Friends” to seventy correspondents who formed a veritable “family” around their spiritual Father. A few years later, in 1963, there would be a thousand “friends” receiving these letters. Originally meant to teach them love of God and neighbour, and the ways of perfection according to Saint John of the Cross, Saint Teresa of Avila, Father de Foucauld, Saint Thérèse of the Child Jesus, Saint John Mary Vianney (the curé of Ars) and Saint Pius X, the evolution of Church and world events broadened their content. They can be grouped roughly, according to their subject matter: Letters 1 to 57, October 1956 - October 1959, on spirituality; Letters 58 to 141, October 1959 - May 1963, on theology; Letters 109 to 116, May - August 1962, on political morality; Letters 153 to 175, October 1963 - July 1964, on the Church; Letters 176 to 220, letters of major controversy, July 1964 - December 1965; and finally, Letters 221 to 229, in 1966, on the Creed. When Father de Nantes created the Catholic Counter-Reformation movement, the publication of its first bulletin The Catholic Counter-Reformation in the 20th Century in October 1967 brought an end to this series of letters.

  • Logia Logia (plurial of the Greek word: logion) are the sayings or observations of a religious teacher that are retained by his disciples. When it became all too obvious that many of the faithful were no longer receiving the spiritual nourishment that their souls required in their parishes, Father de Nantes had his morning prayers, the homilies of community Mass, and spiritual readings with his commentary recorded on tape and sometimes on video. (Brother Bruno has since continued this practice.) These recordings became known as the “Logia.” People could subscribe to receive these logia on a regular basis. Since the creation of our Catholic Counter-Reformation VOD (video on demand) site, persons interested in these sermons and spiritual reading subscribe to the VOD site where the Logia are now accessible among all our other audio and video productions. Unfortunately they are available in French only. However, if you have a basic knowledge of this language, you will find abundant logia there to help you improve your understanding of spoken French.

  • O
  • OrthodromyThis is originally a navigation term. It is the act or art of great-circle sailing. A ship’s trajectory plotted on a flat map as a straight line looks like the most direct and the shortest route to the destination. However, since the earth is a globe, the shortest trajectory will have the form of an arc on a flat map, although this arc appears deceptively longer.
    Father de Nantes applies the nautical term to God being constantly present and acting in the history of the world to guide its course. This is the divine orthodromy. Although history is fraught with conflicting events, meandering social and political currents, and setbacks, through it all, God is governing the world and leading the holy navigation of the Church, of the world, and especially of France through the millennia, by the shortest trajectory towards the desired Heaven of the Eternal Kingdom and the great judgement to the glory of Christ and the condemnation of Satan.
    Father de Nantes proposes to whoever has the soul of a “disciple” and who places himself under his guidance to model his personal trajectory on this trajectory of the universe, and to take his place in this movement of divine orthodromy. In so doing, the disciple will be a living element in it, in order to belong to this Kingdom of God, to participate actively by joining this grand mystical body that is the Church, in order to struggle there with his brethren against the opposing forces coming from Hell, for the honour of God, “served first,” for the salvation of all men.

  • Our FatherIn the writings of religious communities, intended for their own members, the authors use the expression “our Father” to refer to the founder of their Community, feeling no need to specify further. For example, when a Benedictine writes “our Father,” he means Saint Benedict; when a Carthusian monk writes “our Father,” he is referring to Saint Bruno. Therefore, when you see the expression “our Father” in the writings on this site, you will know automatically that the author is referring to Father Georges de Nantes, the founder of the Little Brothers and Little Sisters of the Sacred Heart, of their Third Order, the Phalange of the Immaculate and of the Catholic Counter-Reformation Movement. If you are a first time reader and unfamiliar with Father de Nantes’ life and the role he played in the Church in the second half of the 20th century, you can get a rapid overview by consulting the Chronology of a life and a work. For a more in-depth knowledge, you can read his biography: Georges de Nantes – The Mystical Doctor of the Catholic Faith.

  • P
  • PhalangistA member of the Phalange of the Immaculate, which is the Third Order of the Little Brothers and Sisters of the Sacred Heart.

  • Phalangist Summer CampOur Catholic Counter-Reformation itinerant cycling camps are not only an enjoyable way for parents to provide their children with wholesome activities in a Catholic environment during the summer vacation, they also reinforce the religious education that they are endeavouring to give their children. A young person’s spiritual development, however, is not complete in adolescence. In early adulthood, when serious decisions are taken concerning the service of the Church and Country: religious life or marriage, career choices, etc., it is important for young adults to continue their religious instruction. This is why Father de Nantes established the summer Camp of the Phalange for young Catholics between the ages of 16 and 26 to prepare them to assume the role that God has prepared for them in His divine orthodromy. The camp is, above all, a ten-day retreat of pray and devotions (in particular, a solemn procession to honour the Immaculate Heart of Mary on August 22, Her feast day). Each camp deals with a topic of general culture. From year to year therefore, the daily lectures vary greatly: theology, history of the Church, history of France, literature, missiology, Catholic Counter-Reformation doctrine, the study of the life of our founder, Father de Nantes, etc. Some years there have been special outings or pilgrimages. Other years, plays that are related to the theme of the camp were staged by the participants. Since 1994, the Phalangist Camp has included a musical oratorio composed by Brother Henry de la Croix and performed by our young people. Throughout the year, the lectures given at the August camp are made available, one lecture per month, on video, and they are now published on our Catholic Counter-Reformation VOD (video on demand) site. Unfortunately, all the video lectures on this VOD site are available in French only. However, if you have a basic knowledge of French, you will find abundant lectures to help you improve your understanding of spoken French.

150 Points (The)From 1975 on, Father de Nantes became more and more concerned about elaborating a doctrine for the restoration of the Church and the rebuilding of Christendom. From his reflection and studies, our Father developed a body of doctrine that he organised and summarised in 150 articles. These became known as the 150 Points of the Catholic, Royal, Communitarian Phalange.
This doctrine was divided into three parts: 50 Catholic Points. Our Catholicism is integral. It ardently embraces the whole Faith, sacramentary discipline and moral teaching of the Roman Church. 50 Political Points. The science and art of politics are oriented towards maintaining the tranquillity of the temporal order and safeguarding the common good. Since Father de Nantes reflected especially on his own nation, France, this explains why he entitled this section ‘Royal,” as the traditional and only legitimate government of France is the monarchy of divine right. These principles, however, can either be applied directly or adapted to the political traditions of other nations. 50 Communitarian Points. These points describe the principles that allow the development of a spontaneous ecology. It encompasses in its natural harmony the whole secret of peaceful human happiness. Recently, to comply with the last wishes of our Father, these 150 points were revised by Brother Bruno to integrate into them the supereminent role that the Blessed Virgin Mary plays in our natural and supernatural existence as revealed by the message of Our Lady of Fatima. The text of The 150 Points of the Phalange can be read on our website.

Cathedral of lightFather Georges de Nantes waged a formidable battle to destroy both the heresies of the Modernists and Progressivists that were vitiating the Faith of the Church, and the schism of the Integrists that was tearing her asunder. At the same time he undertook a positive work of strengthening the doctrine of the Church with all the contributions of modern exegetical and archaeological sciences. To refer to this positive side of his work, in August 1995, our Father coined the phrase: ‘a cathedral of light.’ He wrote: “The retreats, lectures and meditations, our ‘Logia’, sessions and camps have furnished building stones, very diverse materials. We did not realise how well they had been preconceived to constitute one day a cathedral of light. Now we have reached the point where all this has to be fit together and cemented, to the glory of Mary, Our Lady of the Rosary, of Fatima, Whose message, like that of Paray-le-Monial, is a fundamental revelation of truth and love.”

Letter To My FriendsDuring the early years of Father de Nantes’ priestly ministry, he made “friends,” many of whom became his spiritual sons and daughters. He began writing each of them letters of spiritual direction. Soon, however, these friends became so numerous that Father was no longer able to address individual letters to each of them. Thus, for the first time, in October 1956, he addressed his first collective “Letter To My Friends” to seventy correspondents who formed a veritable “family” around their spiritual Father. A few years later, in 1963, there would be a thousand “friends” receiving these letters. Originally meant to teach them love of God and neighbour, and the ways of perfection according to Saint John of the Cross, Saint Teresa of Avila, Father de Foucauld, Saint Thérèse of the Child Jesus, Saint John Mary Vianney (the curé of Ars) and Saint Pius X, the evolution of Church and world events broadened their content. They can be grouped roughly, according to their subject matter: Letters 1 to 57, October 1956 - October 1959, on spirituality; Letters 58 to 141, October 1959 - May 1963, on theology; Letters 109 to 116, May - August 1962, on political morality; Letters 153 to 175, October 1963 - July 1964, on the Church; Letters 176 to 220, letters of major controversy, July 1964 - December 1965; and finally, Letters 221 to 229, in 1966, on the Creed. When Father de Nantes created the Catholic Counter-Reformation movement, the publication of its first bulletin The Catholic Counter-Reformation in the 20th Century in October 1967 brought an end to this series of letters.

Logia Logia (plurial of the Greek word: logion) are the sayings or observations of a religious teacher that are retained by his disciples. When it became all too obvious that many of the faithful were no longer receiving the spiritual nourishment that their souls required in their parishes, Father de Nantes had his morning prayers, the homilies of community Mass, and spiritual readings with his commentary recorded on tape and sometimes on video. (Brother Bruno has since continued this practice.) These recordings became known as the “Logia.” People could subscribe to receive these logia on a regular basis. Since the creation of our Catholic Counter-Reformation VOD (video on demand) site, persons interested in these sermons and spiritual reading subscribe to the VOD site where the Logia are now accessible among all our other audio and video productions. Unfortunately they are available in French only. However, if you have a basic knowledge of this language, you will find abundant logia there to help you improve your understanding of spoken French.

OrthodromyThis is originally a navigation term. It is the act or art of great-circle sailing. A ship’s trajectory plotted on a flat map as a straight line looks like the most direct and the shortest route to the destination. However, since the earth is a globe, the shortest trajectory will have the form of an arc on a flat map, although this arc appears deceptively longer.
Father de Nantes applies the nautical term to God being constantly present and acting in the history of the world to guide its course. This is the divine orthodromy. Although history is fraught with conflicting events, meandering social and political currents, and setbacks, through it all, God is governing the world and leading the holy navigation of the Church, of the world, and especially of France through the millennia, by the shortest trajectory towards the desired Heaven of the Eternal Kingdom and the great judgement to the glory of Christ and the condemnation of Satan.
Father de Nantes proposes to whoever has the soul of a “disciple” and who places himself under his guidance to model his personal trajectory on this trajectory of the universe, and to take his place in this movement of divine orthodromy. In so doing, the disciple will be a living element in it, in order to belong to this Kingdom of God, to participate actively by joining this grand mystical body that is the Church, in order to struggle there with his brethren against the opposing forces coming from Hell, for the honour of God, “served first,” for the salvation of all men.

Our FatherIn the writings of religious communities, intended for their own members, the authors use the expression “our Father” to refer to the founder of their Community, feeling no need to specify further. For example, when a Benedictine writes “our Father,” he means Saint Benedict; when a Carthusian monk writes “our Father,” he is referring to Saint Bruno. Therefore, when you see the expression “our Father” in the writings on this site, you will know automatically that the author is referring to Father Georges de Nantes, the founder of the Little Brothers and Little Sisters of the Sacred Heart, of their Third Order, the Phalange of the Immaculate and of the Catholic Counter-Reformation Movement. If you are a first time reader and unfamiliar with Father de Nantes’ life and the role he played in the Church in the second half of the 20th century, you can get a rapid overview by consulting the Chronology of a life and a work. For a more in-depth knowledge, you can read his biography: Georges de Nantes – The Mystical Doctor of the Catholic Faith.

PhalangistA member of the Phalange of the Immaculate, which is the Third Order of the Little Brothers and Sisters of the Sacred Heart.

Phalangist Summer CampOur Catholic Counter-Reformation itinerant cycling camps are not only an enjoyable way for parents to provide their children with wholesome activities in a Catholic environment during the summer vacation, they also reinforce the religious education that they are endeavouring to give their children. A young person’s spiritual development, however, is not complete in adolescence. In early adulthood, when serious decisions are taken concerning the service of the Church and Country: religious life or marriage, career choices, etc., it is important for young adults to continue their religious instruction. This is why Father de Nantes established the summer Camp of the Phalange for young Catholics between the ages of 16 and 26 to prepare them to assume the role that God has prepared for them in His divine orthodromy. The camp is, above all, a ten-day retreat of pray and devotions (in particular, a solemn procession to honour the Immaculate Heart of Mary on August 22, Her feast day). Each camp deals with a topic of general culture. From year to year therefore, the daily lectures vary greatly: theology, history of the Church, history of France, literature, missiology, Catholic Counter-Reformation doctrine, the study of the life of our founder, Father de Nantes, etc. Some years there have been special outings or pilgrimages. Other years, plays that are related to the theme of the camp were staged by the participants. Since 1994, the Phalangist Camp has included a musical oratorio composed by Brother Henry de la Croix and performed by our young people. Throughout the year, the lectures given at the August camp are made available, one lecture per month, on video, and they are now published on our Catholic Counter-Reformation VOD (video on demand) site. Unfortunately, all the video lectures on this VOD site are available in French only. However, if you have a basic knowledge of French, you will find abundant lectures to help you improve your understanding of spoken French.